1)  Lightening
2)  Tap water
3)  Disturbances in living quarters
4)  Breeding phasmids in living quarters


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Lightening

  • although many (if not most) phasmid species do not need too much light, still some light should be present in our breeding rooms
  • I have made the experience that Achrioptera (A.p.cliquennoisi, A. fallax) do thrive better when there is enough light in their cages. Achrioptera do even like direct sun light, they will crawl out into the sun from a shady place. But of course one has to be very careful with direct sunlight, otherwise the cage will overheat quickly
  • if you do not enough natural light available in your phasmid room (like me), then it is advisable to install some additional artificial lighting. I am using LED flood lights (see pic), these use a minmal amount of energy and are quite safe
  • some phasmid species (e.g. Phyllium, Achrioptera) hatch during daytime (usually in the early morning hours). This strongly suggests that a day-night cycle is needed

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Tap water

  • might chlorinated which could be harmful to insects (as it is for humans). If you do not know how your tap water is being preserved, then as your local water supplier
  • in case your tap water is chlorinated then it is be better to use bottled water. Both for you and your phasmids
  • to briskly boil water for some time is said to reduce chlorine to some degree, as some chlorine evaporates

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 Disturbances in living quarters

  • a livingroom and a bedroom are not really ideal places for breeding phasmids. In such places there often is quite a lot of commotion - lighting is going on and off irregularely, people rush in and out ect.
  • music at deafening volume might be fun for the two-legged listener, but this does not benefiting phasmids
  • these influences mean an ongoing stress for the animals, which can negatively impact their developement and health
  • some species might be quite tolerant towards such conditions and breed rather well, which does not mean that they are not stressed
  • but if you fail to breed some species you may wanna take these conditions into consideration

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Breeding phasmids in living quarters

  • in many phasmid cages some mould will grow inevitably. And mould has that naughty habit to multiply by spores. These spores are produced by the billions and so lightweight that even the lightest breeze carries them away. This results in an increased concentration of mould spores in the air of a breeding room. I have measured this, as I am also working in a microbiological laboratory
  • thus mould spores end up in our lungs, and they are a potential health risk. And the more spores are in the air, health hazard increases
  • without overreacting, still breeders should be aware of this and take possible measures to minimize the intake of mould spores