Basics of Phasmid breeding

  • as far as possible, keep only one species per cage. This makes it much easier to screen and oversee the developement of a culture and it is much easier to avoid overpopulation
  • problems cause by detrimental overpopulaton:
    • obviously phasmids in overpopulated cages are much more stressed, which badly hampers their developement and health
    • problems during moulting (ecdysis) are quite frequent. This often leads to crippled specimens, with missing legs or even badly deformed bodies. Such deformations can be leathal
    • phasmids tend to chew on each other (especially Phyllium)
    • phasmids from badly overcroved cages tend to be weaker and smaller in size than specimens which grew up in commodious cages
  • use your own sensitivity to appraise whether your cages are overcrowded or not.  Being considerate to the needs of other living beings is even in this hobby a more than welcome virtue
  • keep nymphs seperate from adults
    • when nymphs are being kept seperate from adults, then one has a much better overview about the nymph's condition and developement
    • then nymphs are much better protected during the moulting process, when they are very vulnerable
  • cut off the margins all around the food plant leaves for freshly hatched nymphs, they will start to feed much easier and readily
  • cages, incubations containers and containers for the food plants should be cleansed regularely, without becoming too meticulous about it. A basic cleanliness is a must when breeding phasmids. Not even pigs like to live in their own dirt, only two-legged pigs make them live that way
  • about temperatur:
    • in my breeding cages temperatures range between 19 - 22°C in winter and 20 - 25°C in summer
    • generally it is better to avoid that temperatures rise above 27°C or drop below 18°C for a prolonged time
  • on humitity:
    • do not keep phasmids too moist, they are no fish
    • usually it is enough to spray water just a few times per week, unless humidity is very low (< 60% rH)
    • if you have to spray more often, then at least let the water dry up completely before spraying again
    • even Phyllium do very well when kept at a moderately high humidity, 60 - 70% rH is good enough. Just the adult Phyllium males when kept at a higher humidity (80+ % rH)